The Application of Spikes

Thanks to their material and their profiled surface, Duplo Horseshoes are well protected against slipping. However, there are situations in which additional anti-slide protection is necessary.

The small spikes are used as a preliminary stage to studs - just like tungsten carbide pins in traditional horseshoes. You can easily screw them into the synthetic material of the Duplo Horseshoe with a suitable adapter.

Spikes in the Heel Area
We generally use two spikes per horseshoe and place them below the heels. In many cases, this simple procedure provides for sufficient anti-slide protection.

In order to use spikes in the heel area, we recommend the following equipment:
• a waterproof felt pen,
• a cordless screwdriver with speed regulation,
• a wood drill bit of 5 mm with centering point,
• a spike adapter for the screwdriver
• and, of course, a sufficient number of spikes (size L).

 

First, you use your pen to highlight the desired position of the spikes on the bottom side of the horseshoe. There are three aspects to consider:

1.) For production-related reasons, there are two holes of about 8 mm in the heel area. These holes are not suitable for spikes.

2.) The spikes should be placed below the hoof wall to avoid pressuring the sole or the frog.

3.) At the same time, be careful to keep enough space between the spikes and the rim of the horseshoe in order to keep the spikes from pulling out.

 

Use your drill bit to drill a flat dimple (about 1 or 2 mm) into the synthetic material at both marked positions. When placed in this dimple, the spike won't slide away when screwed in. Do not pre-drill or drill deeper - otherwise, the Spike won't be firmly fixated in the horseshoe!

 

Then, you place the spike on the adapter in such a way that the two pegs of the adapter completely fill out the two grooves of the spike.

 

After that, you place the tip of the spike in the center of the dimple and then slowly and vertically screw it into the synthetic material with moderate pressure and at slow speed. You can stabilize the adapter with the other hand.

 

The spike fits perfectly when only the small hard metal head overtops the surface of the horseshoe. If the spike isn't screwed in enough, it will easily get lost and also represents a risk of injury for both man and horse. If the spike is screwed in too far, it can't reach its full potential. In addition, its tip might break through the hoof side of the horseshoe. In order to ensure durability, the spike must be neither overwound nor turned back.

   

   

Spikes in the Toe and Quarter Area
Some new Duplo models are produced with prefabricated dimples in the toe and quarter area which facilitate placing the spikes. Depending on the size and the model of the horseshoe, you can use up to eight spikes per horseshoe. You only have to decide how many spikes you would like to use - there are no further preparations necessary.

Careful: The prefabricated dimples are only placed around the toe and quarters. You still have to apply the traditional method (see above) for spikes in the heel area.

Currently, all Duplo models with quarter clips (except for the STS models) between 102 mm and 170 mm (round shape) and between 110 mm and 166 mm (oval shape) are produced with dimples.

 

The application itself is really simple. You only need the following equipment:
• a cordless screwdriver with speed regulation,
• a spike adapter for the screwdriver
• and, again, a sufficient number of spikes (size L).

Set the spike on the adapter and place the tip of the spike in the center of the dimple. Slowly and vertically screw it into the synthetic material with moderate pressure and at slow speed. We recommend stabilizing the adapter with the other hand.

 

Spikes in STS Models
Careful: In case of our STS models, regular spikes (size L) are not suitable for the holes in the toe area of the metal inlay. You can apply regular spikes in the heel area; there are smaller spikes (size M) and a fitting adapter available for the application of spikes in the toe area.

Latest Update: 2018-02-06